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Woman remains in critical condition after hit by Tesla rental in deadly crash

Soo Youn

A California woman who was on an anniversary trip when she was struck by a rented Tesla remained in critical condition in a San Francisco hospital on Tuesday, authorities said.

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The woman, Kelly Dean, and her husband Benjamin, were in the Bay Area to celebrate their wedding anniversary and were walking in San Francisco’s Tenderloin district when a 21-year old woman in a Tesla she rented through the Getaround app allegedly blew through a red light and struck the couple on Sunday afternoon, police said.

On Sunday afternoon, Kelsey Mariah Cambridge, 21, of Vallejo, was driving her rented Tesla, “proceeded through a red light” and “struck a Mini Cooper causing both vehicles to lose control” before striking two pedestrians, San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) spokesperson Adam Lobsinger wrote in a statement.

Dash cam video from a nearby Uber driver obtained by San Francisco ABC station KGO showed Kelly Dean throwing her arm around her husband as the car suddenly approached.

Both the Deans were taken to San Francisco General Hospital, where Benjamin Dean died.

“The drivers of both vehicles were uninjured,” the SFPD statement said. “Both drivers remained on scene and are cooperating with investigators. Alcohol and/or drugs do not appear to be a factor in the collision.”

Cambridge was arrested on one count of vehicular manslaughter and one count of running a red light.

Kelly Dean remained in critical condition on Tuesday, a spokesperson for San Francisco General Hospital said.

“She was incoherent, gurgling noises, she was on her stomach with her head off to one side,” Bob Navarro, who

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Senate votes to make 9/11 fund permanent as first responders, Jon Stewart look on

Sarah Kolinovsky and Trish Turner

In a show of major bipartisan agreement, the Senate on Tuesday voted 97-2 to make the 9/11 victims compensation fund permanent, as first responders and comedian Jon Stewart looked on from the Senate Gallery.

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Stewart and others rose to a standing ovation as the vote passed the threshold needed and several senators, including New York Democrat Sen. Kristen Gillibrand, who had helped lead the effort, joined the applause from the Senate floor.

The House passed the measure 402-12 earlier this month. It now heads to President Donald Trump’s desk. Because more than two-thirds of the Senate and House supported the bill, Congress could override a veto if Trump objected, but he is expected to sign it.

PHOTO: 9/11 first resonder and FealGood Foundation co-founder John Feal speaks after the U.S. Senate voted to renew permanent authorization of September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, on Capitol Hill July 23, 2019 in Washington.Mark Wilson/Getty Images
9/11 first resonder and FealGood Foundation co-founder John Feal speaks after the U.S. Senate voted to renew permanent authorization of September 11th Victim Compensation Fund, on Capitol Hill July 23, 2019 in Washington.

At a news conference afterward, Gillibrand said, “Today is not a celebration. It’s a deep sigh of relief.” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat, said, “Righteousness sometimes — sometimes — in this mangled town sometimes prevails.”

After Gillibrand introduced him as a “hero,” Stewart said, “Yes, I think we can all agree I’m the real hero. Hard not to see it that way,” he said as laughter broke out.

“This has been the honor of my life … We can never repay all that the 9/11 community has done for our country.Today, they can exhale….There’ve been too many funerals. Too many hospices. These families deserve better,” he said.

The fund was created to provide compensation to anyone who suffered physical harm or was killed as a result of the terrorist-related aircraft crashes or the debris removal efforts that took place in the immediate aftermath of those crashes. Before Tuesday’s vote, the fund was set to run out of money in December 2020.

Stewart has been a major proponent of making the fund permanent and before Tuesday’s vote he posed for a photo as he tried to keep up the pressure on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell

PHOTO: Jon Stewart, former host of The Daily Show, smiles as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walks by at the Ohio Clock Corridor in the Capitol, July 23, 2019.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images
Jon Stewart, former host of The Daily Show, smiles as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walks by at the Ohio Clock Corridor in the Capitol, July 23, 2019.

His celebrity shone a spotlight on the issue, and his testimony on Capitol Hill ripped lawmakers for failing to fully fund the program.

PHOTO: Jon Stewart arrives before testifying during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on reauthorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund on Capitol Hill on June 11, 2019 in Washington, DC.Zach Gibson/Getty Images
Jon Stewart arrives before testifying during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on reauthorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund on Capitol Hill on June 11, 2019 in Washington, DC.

“They responded in five seconds,” Stewart shouted at a hearing on June 11. “They did their jobs. With courage grace, tenacity, humility. Eighteen years later, do yours!”

Even as Stewart worked toward an expeditious solution, some 9/11 victims were not able to see the fruits of his labor. NYPD Detective Luis Alvarez passed away from cancer just weeks before the bill was passed.

Alvarez had given his badge to McConnell, a sign of the promise McConnell made to the ailing detective to bring the legislation to the Senate floor for a vote without any political jockeying over the budget.

PHOTO: Michael OConnelll, left, John Feal, center, and Jon Stewart, right, applaud Luis Alvarez during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on reauthorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund.Zach Gibson/Getty Images
Michael O’Connelll, left, John Feal, center, and Jon Stewart, right, applaud Luis Alvarez during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on reauthorization of the September 11th Victim Com

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Man found dead in vacant grocery store 10 years after he disappeared

Emily Shapiro

Ten years after an Iowa man mysteriously disappeared, his body was discovered wedged behind a cooler in a vacant grocery store where he used to work, police said.

In 2009, Larry Ely Murillo-Moncada was a 25-year-old working at a No Frills Supermarket store in Council Bluffs, said Council Bluffs police officials.

On Nov. 28, 2009, Murillo-Moncada’s parents reported him missing, telling authorities that their son “became upset and ran out of their home,” said police.

He was never seen alive again.

PHOTO: An undated photo of Larry Ely Murillo-Moncada. He disappeared in 2009 and his body was found trapped inside a grocery store in 2019.Council Bluffs Police Department
An undated photo of Larry Ely Murillo-Moncada. He disappeared in 2009 and his body was found trapped inside a grocery store in 2019.

A decade later, on Jan. 24, 2019, crews were removing shelving and coolers at the now-vacant grocery store and discovered a body, said police. Last week Council Bluffs police learned from the state investigators that the body was identified as Murillo-Moncada, police officials announced Monday.

Investigators believe Murillo-Moncada ran from his home, went to the grocery store, climbed on the coolers, and then fell into a roughly 18-inch gap between the back of the cooler and the wall and became trapped, said police.

The death has been classified as accidental, police said. His autopsy indicates no signs of trauma, said police.

PHOTO: The former location of the No Frills Supermarket in Council Bluffs, Iowa.Google Maps Street View
The former location of the No Frills Supermarket in Council Bluffs, Iowa.

The store wasn’t searched when Murillo-Moncada went missing because he wasn’t scheduled to work that day, Council Blu

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Driver arrested after 3-year-old boy died from being left on scorching hot bus

Emily Shapiro

Exactly one year after a 3-year-old boy died from being left on scorching hot bus outside a Houston day care, the driver of the bus was indicted, prosecutors said Tuesday.

Former bus driver Maurice Mitchell, 62, was indicted Friday and arrested Tuesday for injury to a child by recklessly causing serious bodily injury or death — a second-degree felony — according to the Harris County District Attorney’s office.

On July 19, 2018, 3-year-old Raymond “R.J.” Pryer Jr. was left on a hot bus for several hours after the bus returned to a day care from a field trip.

PHOTO: A 3-year-old boy left unattended in a blistering-hot daycare bus for at least three-and-a-half hours died in Houston.ABC News, FILE
A 3-year-old boy left unattended in a blistering-hot daycare bus for at least three-and-a-half hours died in Houston.

When R.J.’s father went to pick him up from day care that day, he found the 3-year-old unresponsive in the 113-degree bus, authorities said at the time.

PHOTO: In this Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018 photo taken in Houston, a pin on the lapel of Dikeisha Whitlock-Pryers jacket shows a photo of her son, Raymond Pryer Jr.Elizabeth Conley/AP Photo
In this Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018 photo taken in Houston, a pin on the lapel of Dikeisha Whitlock-Pryer’s jacket shows a photo of her son, Raymond Pryer Jr.

Mitchell had allegedly “disengaged a passenger safety alarm, which was to safeguard young passengers from being left behind,” without first looking through the bus to make sure kids weren’t left there, prosecutors said in a statement.

PHOTO: A 3-year-old boy left unattended in a blistering-hot daycare bus for at least three-and-a-half hours died in Houston.ABC News, FILE
A 3-year-old boy left unattended in a blistering-hot daycare bus for at least three-and-a-half hours died in Houston.

R.J.’s parents filed a lawsuit against the day care which has since had its operating license revoked, according to ABC Houston station KTRK.

PHOTO: In this Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018 photo, Raymond Pryer comforts Dikeisha Whitlock-Pryer while they talk to the media in Houston, about their 3-year-old son, Raymond Pryer Jr., who died after he was left in a bus for hours.Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP
In this Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018 photo, Raymond Pryer comforts Dikeisha Whitlock-Pryer while they talk to the media in Houston, about their 3-year-old son, Raymond Pryer Jr., who died after he was left in a bus for hours.

A memorial bench dedicated to R.J. was unveiled on Saturday at Doss Park, where the 3-year-old had been on the field trip the day he died, said prosecutors.

Hot car deaths reached a record level last year with at least 52 children killed, including R.J., according to national nonprofit KidsAndCars.org.

“As the summer heat intensifies, we

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Police department clarifies that ‘meth-gators’ are not real

Julia Jacobo

A Tennessee police department that warned residents about the possible after-effects of flushing their drugs down the toilet is now clarifying that meth-gators do not exist “at this time.”

On July 13, the Loretto Police Department asked people in possession of drugs — both illegal and legal prescription drugs — to refrain from sending the substances down sewage pipes, for fear that it could end up in retention ponds and be ingested by ducks, geese and even gators.

The post was in response to a drug bust in which they found the suspect attempting to flush 24 fluid ounces of liquid meth down the toilet.

“Furthermore, if it made it far enough we could create meth-gators in Shoal Creek and the Tennessee River down in North Alabama,” police quipped, referencing a June report that someone was feeding meth to a squirrel. “They’ve had enough methed up animals the past few weeks without our help.”

PHOTO: An alligator in Florida.STOCK PHOTO/Getty Images
An alligator in Florida.

After the initial post was picked up by media outlets around the world, police felt the need to make clear that meth-gators are not “real.”

“We’ve had to explain that to our cousins across the pond twice,” the post read.

Last week, Loretto Police Chief Bobby Joe Killen told ABC News that there have been no reports of wild animals affected by drugs in the area.

“As far as I know, there’s no methed-up gators being sighted anywhere,” Killen said. “It’s just a joke to let people know they don’t need to be flushing their drugs of any kind down the sewer system. They need to dispose of it i

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FDA launches new campaign against e-cigarettes

Laura Zaccaro

The Food and Drug Administration released its first series of public service announcements Tuesday targeting what Acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless calls “the troubling epidemic of youth vaping.”

The PSAs are part of the FDA’s “The Real Cost Youth E-cigarette Prevention Campaign,” designed to prevent young people from using e-cigarettes and potentially becoming addicted to nicotine.

The PSAs, called “Magic,” feature British street magician and social media star Julius Dein. In the ads, Dein surprises teens by turning e-cigarette pods and devices into traditional nicotine cigarettes.

The intent of “The Real Cost” campaign is to educate teens on the similarity between the two tobacco products – a connection teens don’t often make, believing that e-cigarettes are safer than nicotine cigarettes.

By using these new PSAs, in addition to social media and in-school ads, the FDA hopes to stop middle and high schoolers from using e-cigarettes or prevent them from starting.

In 2018, CDC and FDA data showed that more than 3.6 million U.S. youth, including 1 in 5 high school students and 1 in 20 middle school students, used e-cigarettes in the previous month.

Parents and health professionals are alarmed by these statistics because, like traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes contain nicotine which is highly addictive.

Matthew L. Myers, the president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, told ABC News, “We now know conclusively that kids who start using E- cigarettes are far more likely to go onto smoke cigarettes.”

On “Good Morning America,” ABC News Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton explained how e-cigarettes can affect teens.

“We have to remember the developing brain [is] exquisitely sensitive to chemicals. We know nicotine is highly addictive that can result in a lack

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Congress prepares for ‘reticent’ witness Robert Mueller

Benjamin Siegel and Katherine Faulders

Facing pointed questions about a hot-button government investigation in June 2013, then-FBI Director Robert Mueller didn’t budge.

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“I’m not going to speculate,” he flatly told Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, when pressed on the details of a probe into an Internal Revenue Service targeting scandal.

On Wednesday, Mueller will return to Capitol Hill to face questions about his investigation into Russian efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election. Lawmakers and aides, including many with experience questioning Mueller, don’t expect him to be any more forthcoming.

“He is a reticent witness even under the best of circumstances,” House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said at the Aspen Security Forum, held in Colorado last week.

“[Mueller] never gives a 10-word answer when a one word answer will do,” one senior Democratic aide said. “He does not volunteer information.”

While they may downplay Mueller’s expected testimony, for months Democrats have depicted the former special counsel as the star witness of their investigations into President Donald Trump’s actions. As the Trump administration has resisted their subpoenas for documents and witness testimony, Mueller — they have said — could help “tell the story” of the 448-page report that most Americans haven’t read.

“We hope it won’t end up being a dud,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler said Sunday on Fox News. “We’re going to ask specific questions about — ‘look at page 344 paragraph 2, please read it. Does that describe obstruction of justice, and did you — did you find that the president did that?’ for example.”

PHOTO: Chairman Jerry Nadler presides over the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Oversight of the U.S. Copyright Office on June 26, 2019 in Washington.Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Newscom
Chairman Jerry Nadler presides over the House Judiciary Committee hearing on “Oversight of the U.S. Copyright Office” on June 26, 2019 in Washington.

Mueller is set to testify for three hours before the House Judiciary Committee and two hours before the House Intelligence Committee in back-to-back sessions. The first hearing will focus on Volume II, the potential episodes of obstruction of justice investigated by the special counsel. The second hearing will focus on Russia’s interference in the 2016 election.

Mueller’s investigation found no evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, but did not determine whether Trump obstructed justice, nor did the report “exonerate” the president.

Breaking his silence about the 22-month investigation in May, Mueller attempted to set expectations for any appearances on Capitol Hill, as lawmakers wrangled with his team behind the scenes to secure his testimony.

“The report is my testimony,” Mueller said. “I would not provide information beyond that which is already public in any appearance before Congress.”

Some Democrats believe that even with his reticence to testify beyond the nature of his report, Mueller’s words could help them distill the significance of Trump’s actions.

“Russia attacked, Trump welcomed it, and Trump covered it up,” Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., a member of the House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees, told ABC News. “If this comes across as a ‘Law and Order’ episode, rather than giving people a Ph.D. in Russian studies, that is a success.”

The hearing could also be a defining moment in the intraparty impeachment debate.

While more than 90 House Democrats now support launching impeachment proceedings against Trump, many Democrats — including moderate members of the freshman class — have said they’d wait to hear from Mueller before weighing in on impeachment.

“Mr. Mueller would be, would be part of that beginning to let the American people hear directly from witnesses about the conduct of the president and

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Heavy rain drenches Northeast; tropical depression to soak Carolinas

Max Golembo

Severe storms moved through the Northeast late Monday and into Tuesday morning, producing damaging winds of 75 to 80 mph from Virginia to New Jersey.

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Heavy rain came with these storms, including up to 4 inches in Westchester County, just north of New York City, in only a few hours. Flash flooding was reported from Pennsylvania to Connecticut.

There was a total of 480,000 people without power from Wisconsin to New York at 5 a.m.

Flood alerts remain in effect for 12 states from Tennessee to Massachusetts on Tuesday.

PHOTO: Flash flood watches are in effect in the Northeast and parts of western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee on Tuesday.ABC News
Flash flood watches are in effect in the Northeast and parts of western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee on Tuesday.

Severe storm threat shifts south Tuesday into the Carolinas and southern Virginia from Myrtle Beach, South Carolina to Norfolk, Virginia.

The biggest threat with these storms will be damaging winds, heavy rain and frequent lightning.

PHOTO: Severe weather is possible from Myrtle Beach, S.C., to Norfolk, Va., on Tuesday.ABC News
Severe weather is possible from Myrtle Beach, S.C., to Norfolk, Va., on Tuesday.

Tropical depression No. 3 is lingering off Florida’s east coast on Tuesday, but most of the heavy rain is offshore.

PHOTO: Tropical depression No. 3 is lingering off the eastern coast of Florida on Tuesday morning.ABC News
Tropical depression No. 3 is lingering off the eastern coast of Florida on Tuesday morning.

The tropical cyclone will move north, parallel the Southeast coast, throughout the day Tuesday and could bring heavy rain — up to 3 inches — to the Carolinas.

The National Hurricane Center is not forecasting this cyclone to strengthen and get a name.

It is expected to weaken and die out sometime on Wednesday.

PHOTO: The tropical depression is not expected to strengthen into a named storm.ABC News
The tropical dep

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SKorea fires 360 rounds of warning shots at Russian warplane

The Associated Press

South Korean air force jets fired 360 rounds of warning shots Tuesday after a Russian military plane twice violated South Korea’s airspace off the country’s east coast, Seoul officials said in an announcement that was quickly disputed by Russia.

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South Korea said three Russian military planes — two Tu-95 bombers and one A-50 airborne early warning and control aircraft — entered the South’s air defense identification zone off its east coast before the A-50 intruded in South Korean airspace. Russia said later that two of its Tu-95MS bombers were on a routine flight over neutral waters and didn’t enter South Korean territory.

According to South Korean government accounts, an unspecified number of South Korean fighter jets, including F-16s, scrambled to the area and fired 10 flares and 80 rounds from machine guns as warning shots.

Seoul defense officials said the Russian reconnaissance aircraft left the area three minutes later but later returned and violated South Korean airspace again for four minutes. The officials said the South Korean fighter jets then fired 10 flares and 280 rounds from machine guns as warning shots.

South Korea said it was the first time a foreign military plane had violated South Korean airspace since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War.

South Korea’s Foreign Ministry and the Joint Chiefs of Staff summoned Russia’s acting ambassador and its defense attache to protest.

Russia’s Defense Ministry said in a statement that its planes did not enter South Korean airspace. It also said South Korean fighter jets didn’t fire any warning shots, though it said they flew near the Russian planes in what it called “unprofessional maneuvers” and posed a threat.

“If the Russian pilots felt there was a security threat, they would have responded,” the statement said.

South Korea’s presidential national security adviser, Chung Eui-yong, told top Russian security official Nikolai Patrushev that South Korea views Russia’s airspace violation “very seriously” and will take “much stronger” measures if a similar incident occurs, according to South Korea’s presidential office.

The former Soviet Union supported North Korea and provided the country with weapons during the Korean War, which killed millions. In 1983, a Soviet air force fighter jet fired an air-to-air missile at a South Korean passenger plane that strayed into Soviet territory, killing all 269 people on board. Relations between Seoul an

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Vice President Pence canceled visit to NH rehab linked to drug dealer investigation

Jack Date, Luke Barr and Alexander Mallin

A New Hampshire man who recently pleaded guilty to facilitating illegal distribution of fentanyl worked at a opioid treatment center Vice President Mike Pence was slated to visit earlier this month, a trip that was abruptly cancelled without explanation.

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Jeffrey Hatch, previously the Chief Business Development Officer at Granite Recovery Centers, pleaded guilty last Friday to arranging the pickup of “approximately 1,500 grams of fentanyl” from a Massachusetts dealer and arranging its delivery to an unidentified individual in New Hampshire, according to court documents.

The investigation into Hatch was at least part of the reason Pence’s visit was canceled, according to sources familiar with the matter.

The illegal conduct took place nearly two years ago, according to a plea agreement, when Hatch used his phone to arrange the pickup 1,500 grams of fentanyl, a highly addictive opioid, from a Massachusetts drug supplier and deliver it to a New Hampshire drug distributor. That New Hampshire drug dealer went on to sell the fentanyl to an undercover law enforcement officer, according to court documents.

As part of the plea agreement, Hatch could face as much as four years in prison with a maximum fine of $250,000.

“I am shocked and disappointed to learn today that Jeff Hatch has pled guilty to a drug offense,” Granite Recovery Centers CEO Eric Spofford said Monday in a statement to ABC News. “Granite Recovery Centers terminated Jeff’s employment today immediately upon learning about this matter.”

A spokesperson for the U.S. Attorney in New Hampshire said, “We can’t comment on pending litigation.”

It was not immediately clear what additional litigation might be pending.

Hatch according to GRC’s website was a former NFL lineman who played for the New York Giants for one season. He was front and center for many of GRC’s promotional events, though it is not immediately clear whether he would have attended or interacted with the vice president on his planned visit to the center earlier this month.

PHOTO: Vice President Mike Pence delivers remarks during the unveiling of a display featuring the spacesuit of Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum July 16, 2019, in Washington, DC.Bill Ingalls/ZUMAPRESS.com/Newscom
Vice President Mike Pence delivers remarks during the unveiling of a display featuring the spacesuit of Apollo 11 a

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